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By General Family Dentistry, Crown and Bridge, Endodontics, Emergency Appointments
October 05, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implant  
ShouldYouTakeanAntibioticBeforeImplantSurgery

Although getting an implant requires surgery, it's usually a minor affair. Chances are good that after just a few days recuperation you'll be back completely to your normal activities.

But like many other minor surgeries, an implant procedure does pose a slight risk of post-op infection. That's especially so with any dental procedure like implant surgery, since the mouth harbors numerous strains of bacteria that could escape into the bloodstream. For most people, though, a post-op infection doesn't pose a major problem since their immune system kicks in immediately to defeat it.

But some patients with less than robust immune systems or other health problems can have serious complications from an infection. Among other things, infected tissues around an implant may not heal properly, putting the implant at significant risk for failure.

If you have a condition that makes a post-op infection problematic, your dentist or physician may recommend you take an antibiotic before your procedure. Known as prophylactic (preventive) antibiotic treatment, it's intended to give a weakened immune system a head-start on any potential infection after a procedure.

Using antibiotics in this way has been a practice for several decades, and at one time were recommended for a wide list of conditions. That's changed in recent years, though, as evidence from numerous studies seems to show the risk to benefit ratio isn't significant enough to warrant its use in all but a handful of conditions.

Both the American Dental Association and the American Heart Association recommend prophylactic antibiotics for patients with prosthetic heart valves, past infective endocarditis, a heart transplant and some congenital heart conditions. Some orthopedists may also recommend it for patients with prosthetic joints.

Even if you don't fall into these particular categories, prophylactic antibiotics may still be beneficial if you have a compromised immune system or suffer from a disease like diabetes or lung disease. Whether or not a prophylactic antibiotic is a prudent step given your health status is a discussion you should have with both your physician and your dentist.

If they feel it's warranted, it can be done safely in recommended doses. If your health isn't as robust as it could be, the practice could give you a little added insurance toward a successful implant outcome.

If you would like more information about dental implant surgery, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Implants & Antibiotics.”

By General Family Dentistry, Crown and Bridge, Endodontics, Emergency Appointments
September 25, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns   bridgework  
AreImplantsaNo-GoforYouConsiderTheseOtherRestorationOptions

Our primary aim as dentists is to preserve teeth. There are times, however, when preserving a tooth is no longer worth the effort and we must recommend removing it. Fortunately, extracted teeth can be replaced with a functional and attractive restoration.

Today's top tooth-replacement option is the dental implant. Composed of a titanium metal post imbedded into the jawbone, a single dental implant can replace an individual tooth or a series of implants can support other restorations for multiple teeth. Besides being incredibly life-like, dental implants are highly durable and can last for decades.

But dental implants aren't an optimal choice for everyone. Their cost often matches their status as the premier tooth replacement method. And because they require a minimum amount of bone for proper implantation, they're not always feasible for patients with extensive bone loss.

But even if dental implants aren't right for you, and you want a fixed restoration rather than dentures, you still have options. What's more, they've been around for decades!

One is a bonded crown, which works particularly well for a tooth excessively damaged by decay, excessive wear or fractures. After removing all of the damaged portions and shaping the remaining tooth, we cement a life-like crown, custom created for that particular tooth, over the remaining structure.

Besides improving appearance, a crown also protects the tooth and restores its function. One thing to remember, though, is although the crown itself is impervious to disease, the remainder of the natural tooth isn't. It's important then to brush and floss around crowned teeth like any other tooth and see a dentist regularly for cleanings.

Dental bridges are a fixed solution for extracted teeth. It's composed of prosthetic teeth to replace those missing bonded together with supporting crowns on both ends. These crowned teeth are known as abutments, and, depending on how many teeth are being replaced, we may need to increase the number of abutments to support the bridge.

Although durable, crowns or bridges typically don't match the longevity of an implant. And, implants don't require the permanent alteration of support teeth as is necessary with a bridge. But when the choice of implants isn't on the table, these traditional restorations can be an effective dental solution.

If you would like more information on crown or bridge restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Crowns & Bridgework.”

By General Family Dentistry, Crown and Bridge, Endodontics, Emergency Appointments
September 15, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: oral surgery  
LikeJohnnyManzielYouMayNeedanOralSurgeonforaMajorDentalProblem

QB sensation Johnny Manziel has had a varied career in professional football. After playing two seasons for the NFL Cleveland Browns, he quarterbacked for a number of teams in the Canadian Football League. More recently, he joined the Zappers in the new Fan Controlled Football league (FCF). But then with only a few games under his belt, he was waylaid by an emergency dental situation.

It's unclear what the situation was, but it was serious enough to involve oral surgery. As a result, he was forced to miss the Zappers' final regular-season game. His experience is a reminder that some dental problems can't wait—you have to attend to them immediately or risk severe long-term consequences.

Manziel's recent dental problem also highlights a very important specialty of dentistry—oral surgery. Oral surgeons are uniquely trained and qualified to treat and correct a number of oral problems.

Tooth extraction. Although some teeth can be removed by a general dentist, some have complications like multiple roots or impaction that make regular extractions problematic. An oral surgeon may be needed to surgically remove these kinds of problem teeth.

Disease. Oral surgeons often intervene with diseases attacking areas involving the jaws or face. This includes serious infections that could become life-threatening if they're not promptly treated by surgical means.

Bite improvement. Some poor bites (malocclusions) arise from a mismatch in the sizes of the jaws.  An oral surgeon may be able to correct this through orthognathic surgery to reposition the jaw to the skull. This may compensate for the difference in jaw sizes and reduce the bite problem.

Implants. Dental implants are one of the best ways to replace teeth, either as a standalone tooth or as support for a fixed dental bridge or a removable denture.  In some cases, it may be better for an oral surgeon to place the implants into a patient's jawbone.

Reconstruction. Injuries or birth defects like a cleft lip or palate can alter the appearance and function of the face, jaws or mouth. An oral surgeon may be able to perform procedures that repair the damage and correct oral or facial deformities.

Sleep apnea. Obstructive sleep apnea is usually caused by the tongue relaxing against the back of the throat during sleep and blocking the airway. But other anatomical structures like tonsils or adenoids can do the same thing. An oral surgeon could address this situation by surgically altering obstructing tissues.

It's likely most of your dental care won't require the services of an oral surgeon. But when you do need surgical treatment, like Johnny Manziel, these dental specialists can make a big difference in your oral health.

If you would like more information about oral surgery, please contact us or schedule a consultation.

By General Family Dentistry, Crown and Bridge, Endodontics, Emergency Appointments
September 05, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cosmetic dentistry  
4GreatWaystoImproveYourSmile

Self-improvement is an estimated $10 billion annual market—smartphone apps, one-on-one coaching and, of course, books that instruct and inspire people on everything from selling yourself to increasing your self-esteem. But as helpful as these resources might be, don't overlook the self-improvement opportunities that could be awaiting you at a familiar place: your dentist's office.

Cosmetic dental techniques can enhance more than your physical attributes. Because of the importance of smiling in everyday life, improving the appearance of your teeth and gums can fill you with a renewed sense of confidence. A transformed smile might just be a game changer in social and career settings, not to mention your romantic life.

Many cosmetic techniques also improve oral health. It's a double benefit! A more attractive smile is more likely to be a healthy smile.

So, in recognition of Self Improvement Month this September, here are 4 ways you could improve your smile appearance.

Teeth whitening. One of the simplest and most affordable ways to improve your smile appearance is with a teeth-whitening procedure. Years of eating, drinking and (for some) tobacco use can leave teeth yellowed and dull. A professional whitening can brighten your teeth and take years off your smile. With proper care and occasional touch-ups, your brighter, more attractive smile could last for years.

Dental veneers. Chipped, discolored or slightly gapped teeth can detract from an otherwise beautiful smile. Dental veneers could completely change all that. Thin wafers of dental porcelain, veneers bond to the front of teeth and mask all manner of imperfections. And because they're custom designed and colored to blend with other teeth, only you and your dentist need know you're wearing them.

Dental implants. Missing tooth gaps, especially in the visible "smile zone," stand out like a sore thumb. Dental implants, the premier method for tooth replacement, can fill those unsightly gaps and restore your smile. Implants are titanium metal posts imbedded in the jaw that develop strong attachments with the bone. This makes them durable and long-lasting for a truly life-like result.

Orthodontics. Realigning teeth through braces or removable clear aligners is first and foremost therapeutic—it's primarily performed to improve overall dental health. But a huge secondary benefit is a more attractive display of perfectly aligned teeth. That's why orthodontics is widely regarded as the "Original Smile Makeover."

To see if any of these or other procedures—or a combination of them—could transform your smile, make an appointment with us for an exam and consultation. Self-improvement might actually be as close as your teeth.

If you would like more information about cosmetic dental options, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cosmetic Dentistry.”

By General Family Dentistry, Crown and Bridge, Endodontics, Emergency Appointments
August 26, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
HeresWhatYouCanExpectWithDentalImplantSurgery

Getting dental implants is going to require surgery. But don't let that concern you—it's a relatively minor procedure.

Currently the “gold standard” for tooth replacement, an implant consists of a titanium post surgically imbedded in the jawbone. We can affix a life-like crown to a single implant or support a fixed bridge or removable denture using a series of them.

Because placement will determine the restoration's final appearance, we must carefully plan implant surgery beforehand. Our first priority is to verify that you have adequate jawbone available to support an implant.

Additionally, we want to identify any underlying structures like nerves or blood vessels that might obstruct placement. We may also develop a surgical guide, a retainer-like device placed in the mouth during surgery that identifies precisely where to create the holes or channels for the implants.

After numbing the area with local anesthesia, we begin the surgery by opening the gum tissue with a series of incisions to expose the underlying bone. If we've prepared a surgical guide, we'll place it in the mouth at this time.

We then create the channel for the insert through a series of drillings. We start with a small opening, then increase its size through subsequent drills until we've created a channel that fits the size of the intended implant.

After removing the implant from its sterile packaging, we'll directly insert it into the channel. Once in place, we may take an x-ray to verify that it's been properly placed, and adjust as needed. Unless we're attaching a temporary crown at the time of surgery (an alternate procedure called immediate loading), we suture the gums over the implant to protect it.

Similar to other dental procedures, discomfort after surgery is usually mild to moderate and manageable with pain relievers like acetaminophen or ibuprofen (if necessary, we can prescribe something stronger). We may also have you take antibiotics or use antibacterial mouthrinses for a while to prevent infection.

A few weeks later, after the bone has grown and adhered to the implant surface, you'll return to receive your new permanent crown or restoration. While the process can take a few months and a number of treatment visits, in the end you'll have new life-like teeth that could serve you well for decades.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Surgery.”





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